Bianca Phos

 

 SENTIENT STRECHERS 

11 Dezember 4pm  -  20 Dezember 2020

 


 


                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 






 


 

Öffnungszeiten während der 

Ausstellung bitte tel. vereinbaren!!! 

0043( 0) 680 21 63 551 ( U. B. / FOX )

0043 (0) 699 12 33 73 70  ( B. P. )



Kontakt:

Marxergasse 16
A-1030 Wien
0043680 21 63 551
email: offspace@chello.at

 

Mit der freundlichen Unterstützung von:


 Gregor Eldarb / Florian Schmeiser

Dünner als zwei Zehntausendstel eines Millimeters 

 

Ausstellung verlängert !!!

30 Oktober  -  13 November 2020

                                

 

Öffnungszeiten während der 

Ausstellung bitte tel. vereinbaren!!! 

0043(0)6802163551
 




 

 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Dünner als zwei Zehntausendstel eines Millimeters
[Thinner than two ten-thousandths of a millimetre]

 The starting point for the video Dünner als zwei Zehntausendstel eines Millimeters [Thinner than two ten-thousandths of a millimetre] are nature’s formative processes. The piece is inspired, among others, by the German architect Frei Otto. In his work, he was concerned with an intelligent, lightweight, and sustainable way of building that borrowed its designs and construction forms from nature. As nature’s formative processes take place without human intervention, they are also called processes of self-formation. In line with this, for my film I made frames respectively objects on which soap films are applied. On these different objects, reflections of images on a monitor (films, abstractions, art-historical paintings) become visible. For the work’s aesthetics, both the typical motions of soap bubbles and the prismatic colours that, due to the interference of light waves, develop on the thin layer of soap, are essential. The experimental setup consisted of a table, a monitor, and differently formed wire objects: among others, a revolving oval, rectangular frames, concave forms, as well as geometrical shapes that, in addition, were subdivided by threads. Depending on the soap layer’s thickness, the play of colours would last shorter or longer. The optimal conditions for the visibility of interference colours are indirect lighting (with a 45 degrees angle of incidence and the absorption of the reflection at 45 degrees angle of reflection) and a dark background.   Moreover, time is an extremely important factor, for the combination of gravitation and capillary force causes an inhomogeneous wall thickness of the liquid that thins out towards the bottom and becomes more and more colourless (“destructive interference”) until, after around a minute, it bursts. In accordance with these principles of physics, pictures on a monitor were reflected in the diversely shaped soap screens, among them Frei Otto’s experiments banned on film1, but also references in art history from Manet, Man Ray or Buckminster Fuller alike, as well as own photos and videos that reflect the experimental setup itself (its geometrical objects, but also diverse colour schemes, etc.). The film shows very well how these colour schemes, shapes, or different materials like concrete change appearance on the soap film: black-and-white images turn into coloured ones, shapes lose their distinct contours, and usually rigid surfaces start to vibrate.  Art-historic research has shown that for the use of soap bubbles structural aspects (Buckminster Fuller or Frei Otto) played a role, just as did painterly-imaginary ones (Manet, Man Ray). For the film also the notion was significant, for instance, that the result is unforeseeable because, in this case, the pictorial ground – the canvas – is instable and essentially co-determines colour gradients and shapes. Moreover, there are two time-regimes that intertwine: the course of the projected video or image, and the soap film that according to physical conditions – when the soap bubble’s membrane is “thinner than two ten-thousandths of a millimetre” – results in self destruction in the end.     

Gregor Eldarb

Translation: Jeanette Pacher

 


[1] Modeling with soap films, The Institute for Lightweight Structures (IL), University of Stuttgart, Director: Frei Otto (video stills).   

 






  Photo: Stefan Lux

 

Kontakt:

Marxergasse 16
A-1030 Wien
0043680 21 63 551
email: offspace@chello.at

 

Mit der freundlichen Unterstützung von:



 

Stefan Lux

Dichte Kammer / Fox Cut  

1 Feb - 14 Feb 2020



opening  31Jan 2020    19 - 22 Uhr

 

Fragmentary Thoughts on Stefan Lux’s „Dichte Kammer Fox Cut“ (2020)

Record and Remember 1:
On September 1st, 1953 at the age of 27, Henry Gustav Molaison undergoes brain surgery in the hospital of Hartford, Connecticut. The reason for the surgery is severe epilepsy from which Molaison has suffered ever since his childhood. The neurosurgeon removes a piece of temporal lobe in both cerebral hemispheres. The seizures occur less often but from then on, Molaison suffers from anterograde amnesia. His long-term memory is still intact, however his brain is no longer capable of saving new information. Trapped in memories. Forever 27!

Record and Remember 2:
In 1981, William Gibson’s short story “Johnny Mnemonic” is published. In 1995, its screen version of the same name [German version titled “Vernetzt – Johnny Mnemonic”] is released in the cinema. It drafts a world in the year 2021. Here, high-tech industry and hackers are in charge. Johnny is a “mnemonic courier”. To implant a data storage device required for this job in his brain he has to give up parts of his memory. A highly explosive mission puts Johnny’s life in danger. Not only because both corporations and the underworld are after the data but also because the data overload in his brain threatens to blast it. Too much information can be lethal!

Record and Remember 3:
In 2019, Instagram counts 1 billion users worldwide. Of these, around 500 million actively use it every day. Between 2010 and 2016, more than 40 billion photos were shared on this platform. That’s an average of around 80 million pictures per day – Instastories and videos not counted. Instagram: the site where our memories will be stored in future?

Record and Remember 4:
Already in 2014, Vienna-based artist Stefan Lux starts to record everyday impressions on video and arrange them chronologically. Lux is a registrar of casual and random moments. His project that, thanks to its spatio-temporal unfolding, ruptures the logic of conventional storytelling is titled “Dichte Kammer” [Closed Chamber]. “Dichte Kammer” is stream of consciousness, inner monologue, Écriture automatique. The gaze falls on developed and undeveloped landscapes, rooms, along their floors and walls, onto objects, and fragmentary, more or less recognizable details. Now and then an animal. A cat. My cat! Alternating camera perspectives, monochrome cross-fades, fade-in and fade-outs, streams of images, edits, montages at a varying pace from a flash of insight to dwelling briefly – in total, an incredible abundance of impressions. Sensory overload? Depends on the individual condition…
Record and Remember 5:
Dichte Kammer / closed chamber 04.10.2016 19' 29"
Dichte Kammer / closed chamber 03.05.2017 25' 06"
Dichte Kammer / closed chamber 29.12.2017 40' 57"
Dichte Kammer / closed chamber 30.05.2018 53' 20"
Dichte Kammer / closed chamber 05.10.2018 53' 40"
Dichte Kammer / closed chamber 12.04.2019 57' 43"

TO BE CONTINUED, EXTENDED & REVISED

Dichte Kammer deals with compiling and structuring image collections as memory reservoirs” (the artist in an email to the author of this text on Friday, 10th January, 2020, 12:35 a.m.).

Record and Remember 6:
Which memory flashes through one’s mind when thinking of something experienced? Which image does the memory reservoir release?

White light, fade-in: People in an art space attending a lecture accompanied by images and a musical backdrop. Parts of the event not captured in the camera frame appear in the reflections on a glass windowpane. Fade-out.
White light, fade-in: People in an art space observe people in an art space who are attending a lecture accompanied by images and a musical backdrop. Parts of the event in the art space with the people who are attending a lecture accompanied by images and a musical backdrop, and which the camera perspective doesn’t capture directly, appear in the reflections on a glass windowpane of the art space, which is not the art space, in which people observe people in an art space who are attending a lecture accompanied by images and a musical backdrop and where parts of the event…. Fade-out.
People in an art space observing people in an art space, who are attending a lecture accompanied by images… and so on are reflected in a window of the art space, namely that one, in which people observe people in an art space who are attending a lecture… and so on. – “Dichte Kammer Fox Cut” (2020). RECORD, SAVE, TO BE CONTINUED!



Manisha Jothady, January 2020
[Translation: Jeanette Pacher]

 

 






 







Öffnungszeiten während der laufenden Ausstellung:
Fr 18 bis 21Uhr
und JEDERZEIT nach Vereinbarung!

Kontakt:
Marxergasse 16
A-1030 Wien
0043680 21 63 551
email: offspace@chello.at

 

Mit der freundlichen Unterstützung von:



 
Ulla Rossek

30.11. - 20.12. 2019
opening 25. 10. 2019    18 - 21 Uhr

 

 












In his book, “Das Geld im Talmud” [Money in the Talmud] (1930), money scientist Simcha Ejges examines the parts in the Talmud that relate to money. Dating back to the 1st to 5th centuries of our calendar system, they describe debates at rabbinic academies about how to apply the sacred scripture to everyday life, including how to deal with money that was on the edge of “pervading all aspects of life.”
The Talmudic examination of money is considered as grounded in the era of the Roman Empire. The entire coinage was under Roman control. Gold, silver, copper and brass coins were issued as currency. Brisk trading prevailed in the Roman Empire, where a large number of coin names and species circulated. With each new emperor, Roman coins were re-coined. The increasing number of alloy layers caused a huge rise in demand for money. Nero, for instance, determined that the weight of popular coins such as Aureus (gold coin) and Denarius (silver denarius) be reduced, which resulted in a change of the exchange rates of coin metals. 
But what, in fact, defines these coins as money?
According to the Talmud, an official proclamation alone is not sufficient to convert coins into actual money; this also requires the population’s approval. Provided that the barterers decide to accept the money, this allows it to circulate. Due to its being passed from one to another in barter, a currency receives its “circulation capacity” and thus its money form (cash). When the velocity of money suffers a loss, it becomes “bad” money, and in fact forfeits its nature as money. The non-use disrupts the circulation capacity of money and demonetizes a currency on the part of the population.
The severe punishment that Chinese emperor Kublai Khan (1212–1294) inflicted in case of rejecting his money shows just how dangerous a currency’s non-use can be for the sovereign who issues the money. He was the first one to introduce a paper currency, something that had no intrinsic value whatsoever. Under penalty of death, the people were forced to accept the banknotes in exchange for their goods. As a result, it was guaranteed that they again could be exchanged throughout the empire. The paper currency put into circulation under constraint worked as long as the amount of issued money didn’t exceed the reserves of silver and silk invested to serve as collateral. The exorbitant amount of money printed by the state to raise its own funds, however, caused inflations, which ultimately resulted in the elimination of the first paper money.   
Another reason for a coin getting a bad reputation among barters is, according to the Talmud, the rejection of the embossing that attracts one’s attention when dealing with this money. The embossed symbols should serve for identification and contribute to the population’s belief in the stability of the currency’s potency. When an embossing is met with disapproval, however, the circulation capacity of a currency is impaired.

Ulla Rossek
Translation: Janet Pacher











Öffnungszeiten: Während der laufenden Ausstellung!
Fr 18 bis 21Uhr
und JEDERZEIT nach Vereinbarung!

Kontakt:
Marxergasse 16
A-1030 Wien
0043680 21 63 551
email: offspace@chello.at

 

Mit der freundlichen Unterstützung von:



 
Daniela Zeilinger

Mirage,mirage
26.10. - 15.11. 2019

opening 25. 10. 2019    18 - 21 Uhr

 
 
 
Daniela Zeilinger

mirage, mirage




Von Naturwegen diktiert, zeigt sich die „mirage“ als trügerische Annahme einer fiktionalen Wirklichkeit, ähnlich eines Betrugs, der durch wechselhafte Luftschichten unterschiedlichster Temperaturen entsteht und einst die Legende des „Flying Dutchman“ – ein Nährboden für künstlerische Produktionen und übersteigerten Pathos – schuf.

Ohne Zweifel forciert die „mirage“ Wirklichkeiten subjektiver, aber auch kreativer Wahrnehmungen, deren Infragestellung unvermeidlich ist.

Eine konkurrierende Beziehung zwischen wahnhaft, künstlerischer Interpretation und wissenschaftlicher Wahrhaftigkeit, die auch das polarisierende und historische Verhältnis zwischen Fotografie und Malerei prägte.



Wo Malerei als Fiktion galt, erschien die Fotografie als Dokumentation, um in kritischer Auseinandersetzung neue Repräsentationsformen von Wirklichkeiten auszutragen.

Obwohl sich dieses Verhältnis weitgehend gewandelt hat, befragt Daniela Zeilinger die Grenzziehung zwischen der Fotografie, als visuelle Wirklichkeitsdarstellung und der Malerei, als künstlerisches Werk der Imagination, in schichtweisen Arbeitsprozessen, die selbst einer „mirage“ gleichzusetzen sind.



Intuitive Zeichenschritte, sowie technische Zugänge der analogen und digitalen Fotografie bilden den Ausgangspunkt ihrer künstlerischen Arbeit und ermöglichen ein breites Spektrum an Hybridbildungen von Fotografie und Malerei, deren Realitätsbezug weder in direkter Abbildung, noch in freier Interpretation besteht.

Ein manipulativ angelegter Schattenwurf, inszenierte Überlagerungen und mehrfache Bildreproduktionen bewegen sich im Spannungsfeld zwischen Abstraktion und realer Bildkonstruktion. Fragmente der Malerei bilden sich in der Fotografie ab, während farbige Aspekte fast gänzlich ausgelassen oder durch technische Störbilder ersetzt werden, sowie minimal gehalten zur Kenntnisnahme zwingen.



Sukzessiv nähert sich die Künstlerin der Frage nach dem Potenzial der Konnexion von Malerei und Fotografie, wobei letztlich erst das schlussendliche Abbild ihres fotografischen Reproduktionsprozesses das Zusammenspiel von Intuition und Technik in eine ausgewogene Gesamtkomposition übersetzt und das Werk schafft.

Gleich einer „mirage“ manifestiert sich die Frage nach der Wirklichkeit der bildlichen Darstellungen, die mit subtilen Verweisen offenbart oder durch ein Schwarzweiß Verfahren gar ganz verschlossen bleiben können. Deutlich bleiben nur die Übersetzungs- und Transformationsprozesse der Künstlerin, die die Bedingungen der Hervorbringung von Bildern auf malerischer, digitaler und analoger Ebene zu hinterfragen versucht.



Daniela Zeilingers Werke operieren an verschwommenen Übergängen zwischen realer Darstellung, sowie der Täuschung und Wiedererkennung von Malerei und Fotografie, während beide Medien miteinander in Kombination gebracht werden, um dessen symbiotischen Zusammenschluss, sowie deren ästhetischen Eigenschaften zu verdeutlichen.



– Alexandra-Maria Toth








                                                Foto: D. Zeilinger






Öffnungszeiten: Während der laufenden Ausstellung!
Fr 18 bis 21Uhr
und JEDERZEIT nach Vereinbarung!

Kontakt:
Marxergasse 16
A-1030 Wien
0043680 21 63 551
email: offspace@chello.at

 

Mit der freundlichen Unterstützung von: